If you’re anything like me as a “creative type,” then your superb hand-eye coordination fails on the field, diamond, and pitch. And there’s likely little interest in watching others do sports, rubbing in your inadequacy.

Well thank the Lord for Layer Tennis! A product of Coudal Partners, a Chicago-based, multidisciplinary Design Studio, Layer Tennis marries creativity and competition.

Currently in its fourth season, Layer Tennis is a weekly online competition that pins creative talent from around the world against one another. The match begins with a coin toss (just like real life sports!), determining which creative kicks it all off by submitting the first graphic. Following, each creative is given 15 minutes to rebut with an altered composition, which builds off the original post. This goes back and forth for a total of 10 “volleys.” Following the match, the people decide who reigns victorious with a tweet, or whatever network you fancy that currently supports hash tags.

There are few rules to Layer Tennis, and it is always a playful and inspiring experience. Above are a handful of my favorite volleys from various matches Season 4.

         

You can take a look for yourself here.

I highly suggest you follow Layer Tennis on twitter, and join the fun.

-BQ

JJ: Music Guru

Its the third week of my Senior year and so far so good.

I’m JJ Kim the lingua music guru. You can interpret that however you want.

You can expect some music reviews, random nonsense poetry (usually about dumb love stuff), and maybe even some original music but most likely music reviews of cool artists, albums, songs, and what not.

Writing is not my strongest skill so don’t expect any fancy words. :)

For my first official lingua blog post I will talk about what music is to me.

Music at its most basic definition is the idea of tension and release. If a song doesn’t contain those two elements I will most likely never listen to that song again. Music at its most powerful state is a way for me to climb back out of holes that so often surrounding situations put me in. It is 100% true that the best songs are written in times of extreme difficulty. I hope that music impacts you in a way that is as real and powerful as it does to me.

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Jacob Taylor’s Playlist #1 (10/13/14)

I am the business manager for Lingua, but I also have a strong passion for music. I will be posting playlists, album reviews, and other music-related material on the Tumblr on a semi-weekly basis. I’d love to hear suggestions or feedback from you readers!

This first playlist is comprised of some of my favorite tracks I’ve heard this year.

Link to the full playlist: Radio Show 10/13

1. “Jackson”- Cymbals Eat Guitars

 Cymbals Eat Guitars is a band out of New Jersey. To fully recognize the complexity of this song, listen with the lyrics in front of you. They read more like a poetic story than a structured verse-chorus song written by a neo-90s emo band. Cymbals Eat Guitars have perfected their sound on their newest album, LOSE, and this song is a prime example of their efforts.

2. “Fool”- Perfume Genius

 This is my favorite song off of Seattle native Perfume Genius’ new album, “Too Bright”. The album deals with Mike Hadreas’ struggles with sexual identity. The bleak honesty displayed on the album is what has kept me coming back to it. The song itself is written in an interesting format, with the first stanza mirrored by the last, with a few minor alterations. The stanzas are broken up by a beautiful swelling breakdown. The words change only slightly, but it is the heartbreaking tone of his voice that tells the listener all they need to know: love is painful.

3. “Rose 4 U”- TEEN

 TEEN are a band out of Brooklyn, consisting of three sisters and another member. The song’s title, as well as the band’s, reflect the shallowness of a 21st century text culture, yet the lyrics convey the longing we feel for human interaction perfectly. Their sound is a fresh, youthful take on the path that David Byrne cemented with Talking Heads.

4. “Porcelain”- snowbird

 This track has quickly ascended my favorite songs list. It invokes imagery of a desolate winter landscape dotted with small but warming fires. The songwriting is intimate and complex, and is highlighted by a shimmering melody and harmony, which drive the song as it ebbs and flows freely from beginning to end.

5. “Afterburner”- Panda Bear

This song is from Animal Collective frontman Noah Benjamin Lennox, whose stage name is Panda Bear. I appreciate the organic feel of this piece, which sheds traditional songwriting tact, as is often the case with Panda Bear. Instead, he opts for an evolving idea that seems to grow and mature as it plays; it even seems to change with each additional listen. The lyrics are simple, but are sung in this evolutionary style, growing from the first word to the end of each line.

6. “Hayloft”- Mother Mother

 Mother Mother are a Canadian rock band. This song is a quick piece combining the vocal play of Jack White with the tight instrumental control of The Strokes. It wastes no time, clocking in at just over 3 minutes, but those minutes are packed with an exhilarating story of young forbidden love that resonates long after the last notes are plucked.

7. “Call This Home”- An Atlas to Follow

 What starts off sounding like a generic folk-derivative actually turns out to be one of the best him-and-her duets I’ve heard in years. The band, An Atlas to Follow, has barely more followers on social media than my sister’s French bulldog Picasso. So do the music world some justice and get this talented band out to the masses.

8. “All I’ve Ever Known”- Bahamas

 No note is out of place in the final song from Bahamas latest album, titled Bahamas is Afie. Its tempo is slow enough that the invested listener might find his or herself anticipating the next chord, hoping to speed the song up to a cheerier pace. Pay close attention to the strings, as they play an integral part in the emotional pulse of the song.

9. “I Wanna Roll With You”- Connan Mockasin

 Connan Mockasin hails from New Zealand, home of the Shire and, apparently, some weirdly good music. The song combines the grooving sensuality of the 70s with the creepiness of Johnny Depp’s Willy Wonka, and yet, I can’ t get enough of it. Behind the stalker-ish voice hides a seemingly honest and raw plea: I just wanna find your love. This guy might just be the Prince of our generation.

Listen live to my radio show every monday night at kspu.org from 10-11. Tonight I will be playing through this playlist and talking about each song.

-Jacob Taylor

Welcome back SPU. 

If you didn’t know already, Lingua is Seattle Pacific University’s Arts and Literary Journal. We produced two magazines in the Fall and Winter, and a yearly journal in the Spring. These publications are entirely composed of student work. We accept submissions all year round and we pick the best writing and artwork from these submissions and publish them either in the magazines, the journal, or on the blog. 

The question that people ask me most often about Lingua is, “why the llama?” The symbol originates from a poem by British-born American poet Denise Levertov. In her poem, “Come into Animal Presence,” published in 1960, she depicts a llama that later became the emblem for Seattle Pacific University’s artists and writers:

 

“The llama intricately

folding its hind legs to be seated

not disdains but mildly

disregards human approval.”

 

We keep this symbol of the llama out of tradition, but also because the attitude and stubbornness of this llama is still reflected by SPU’s artists and writers today. In the modern world, one of the most vital attitudes to have as an artist or a writer is one of stubbornness—to believe that regardless of society’s pressures to do something practical or profitable, that your story and the story of the human experience needs to be told. Your role as an artist or a writer is not to seek out “human approval,” but rather to “mildly” disregard it.

Lingua is not only for the creative community—it’s for everyone. In her lecture “What is Art For?” Jeanette Winterson claims that, “Art reminds us of all of the possibilities we are persuaded to forget.” We are reminded of this possibility when we watch a good film, or walk through a museum, or read a good story. And as for me, and the Lingua staff, we believe that this reminder is so inherently vital to each individual, and to humanity as a whole.

The Latin meaning of the word “lingua” is “language” or “tongue,” and this journal is a platform for the voice of Seattle Pacific University’s students and community at large. Winterson also says in her lecture, that the exchange rate of art is, “energy for energy, intensity for intensity.” Lingua wants to embody this sort of contagious energy and intensity in the creative community—infinitely inspiring and re-kindling a passion for creating and storytelling on our university’s campus.

We invite you to join us, and we look forward to seeing what you create.

-Natalie Hoekstra, Lingua Editor-in-Chief

On May 23, Elliot Rodger took a gun to the streets of Isla Vista, CA, targeting students of the University of California, Santa Barbara. He succeeded in murdering six people before turning the gun on himself. 
My best friend from high school was in Isla Vista that day. Her apartment was right near the zone where Rodger had been rampaging. On May 23, I was a concerned friend, texting to make sure that she was okay. But I never really imagined how I could be in the exact same role. 
Today, the same kind of tragedy has come to SPU, the place that I’ve called home for the past four years.
Tonight was supposed to be a night of celebration. Not just for Lingua, but for many students who were looking forward to the summer and wrapping up their studies on campus. There is no way to adequately express what effect this violence and agony of this afternoon has done to this community. 
We pray for the family of the man who died today. We pray for the woman who, we last heard, is still in critical condition. We pray for the students who were in Otto Miller at the time of the shooting. 
Lingua community members, please pray with us. 
— Jessica Beebe, Lingua Editor-in-Chief

On May 23, Elliot Rodger took a gun to the streets of Isla Vista, CA, targeting students of the University of California, Santa Barbara. He succeeded in murdering six people before turning the gun on himself. 

My best friend from high school was in Isla Vista that day. Her apartment was right near the zone where Rodger had been rampaging. On May 23, I was a concerned friend, texting to make sure that she was okay. But I never really imagined how I could be in the exact same role. 

Today, the same kind of tragedy has come to SPU, the place that I’ve called home for the past four years.

Tonight was supposed to be a night of celebration. Not just for Lingua, but for many students who were looking forward to the summer and wrapping up their studies on campus. There is no way to adequately express what effect this violence and agony of this afternoon has done to this community. 

We pray for the family of the man who died today. We pray for the woman who, we last heard, is still in critical condition. We pray for the students who were in Otto Miller at the time of the shooting. 

Lingua community members, please pray with us. 

— Jessica Beebe, Lingua Editor-in-Chief

"Recycled Forest" by Emily Reid and Maddy Watt

We at Lingua love getting to see 3D art. Though we have a particularly soft spot for photography and illustration, 3D art always makes us stop! We received this piece from Cascade editor, Emily Reid, and Maddy Watt.

Artist statement from Emily: This is an endeavor to engage the SPU community in the idea of recycling and creating something new and beautiful from the old and useless. Maddy Watt and I worked as partners to collect all the garbage from the SPU students and then assemble in into a fantastical northwest landscape. Journey through this enchanting 3D forest to discover little critters and a whole new way of looking at garbage!